Dennis Roeder Enjoys Neo-Gothic Architecture at USyd

Architect Edmund Blacket designed the Neo-Gothic sandstone original structures of the University of Sydney quadrangle and the Great Tower facility which are icons of the University in Sydney, Australia today, where Dennis Roeder earned his Bachelor of Education. The purchase of land in Darlington in the 20th century enabled the growth of the faculties of the Arts, Science, Education and Social Work, Pharmacy, Veterinary Science, Economics and Business, Architecture and Engineering departments, as well as the Faculty of Medicine. The new School of Information Technologies building opened in 2006, which today plays a significant part in the University’s continuing education program, inaugurated in 1886 and Australia’s longest continuous adult education program.

Dennis Roeder

Undergraduate Dennis Roeder attended the University of Sydney from 2012 to 2015, where he was enrolled in the Faculty of Education and Social Work to earn his Bachelor of Education degree. Roeder also benefited from the establishment of 15 other faculties, including the Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University of Sydney Business School, the Faculty of Dentistry, the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies, the Faculty of Health Sciences, the Sydney Law School, the Sydney Medical School, the Sydney Nursing School, the Faculty of Pharmacy, the Faculty of Science, the Sydney College of the Arts, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and the Faculty of Veterinary Science. According to 2016 rankings by the QS World University, the University of Sydney is 9th in Veterinary Science, 11th in Law, and 16th in Education, the school attended by Roeder. The U.S. News & World Report ranked University of Sydney 51st in the world.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Sydney

Dennis Roeder Attends the University of Sydney

Dennis Roeder of New South Wales, Australia stands poised at the threshold of his life.   This 22-year-old graduate of the University of Sydney has earned his Bachelor of Education degree to go along with his passion for working with young students, and eagerly looks forward to a successful career as a primary school teacher.  Roeder’s alma mater University of Sydney, known as USyd, Australia’s earliest university, is considered today to be a leading institution of learning in the country, with 16 schools of learning offering bachelors, masters and doctoral certifications.  A very large institution, USyd had over 32,000 undergraduate and over 16,000 graduate students in 2011.  The University of Sydney has the singular distinction of being ranked in the top 10 of the world’s most beautiful universities by both the British Daily Telegraph and the Huffington Post.

Dennis Roeder
Dennis Roeder

The University of Sydney boasts five Nobel Laureates from its lists of graduates and faculty, as well as six prime ministers and 24 justices of the High Court of Australia.  24 Rhodes Scholars have arisen from the students of the University of Sydney, a source of inspiration for undergraduate Dennis Roeder during his time there from 2012 to 2015, when he earned his Bachelors of Education degree.  The University of Sydney retains memberships in the Group of Eight, the Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU), the Association of Southeast Asian Institutions of Higher Learning, the Australia-Africa Universities Network (AAUN), the Academic Consortium 21, the Association of Commonwealth Universities and the Worldwide Universities Network.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Sydney

Dennis Roeder Faces a Range of Challenges and Choices in His Australian Teaching Career

Passionate and idealistic young teacher Dennis Roeder, who has recently acquired his Bachelor of Education from the University of Sydney in his native country of Australia, looks forward to a career in primary education in his own New South Wales.  Roeder feels a special affinity for the second and third grades, and while the number of schools in Australia which combine both primary and secondary students has gradually grown, schools which enroll only primary or only secondary students have declined.

In Australia public education from 2000 to 2010, the student to teacher ratio fell, especially in primary schools, where the numbers went from 17.4 to 15.8, while the number of enrolled students increased by 7%.  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students increased by 50% during this time, to 163,000, which is a combination of an actual increase in these students’ enrollment and an improvement in data collection of students who are more likely to identify themselves in these demographics.  Dennis Roeder’s success as a primary school teacher will have a direct impact on the retention rate of students, as the level of student engagement directly affects their participation in school, their continued enrollment in school and their rate of progress through the system.  The Building the Education Revolution program is committed to increasing funding for education throughout Australia.  Government expenditure on education increased markedly between 2008 and 2010, from $5.5 billion to $11.1 billion.  Roeder’s native Australian government is currently working to support his profession overall in his home country.

Dennis Roeder
Australian teacher Dennis Roeder is poised to embark upon his life’s dream:  teaching primary school students in the Australian school system.  Roeder’s duties will be many as a primary school teacher, and not all of his duties will be in instruction.  Grants from the Australian and state and territorial governments are the primary source of school funding, but are not the only places from which funds are derived.  Roeder may also have to track and record funding which comes in from the sale of services, such as the fees for tuition and materials which may be levied by the individual territorial schools.  Dennis Roeder may also need to be cognizant and punctilious of donations and investment returns which are part of the general fund of his school.  Although tuition is free in government schools, fees which cover such diverse items as personal educational materials like textbooks and art supplies may be levied.  Schools may also solicit contributions from parents, both in government supported schools and non-government facilities.  Non-government schools may charge a variety of fees for textbooks, subject materials and as support for extra-curricular activities of students.  Vocational training often charges fees for courses, tuition and materials.  Adult and community education courses also are often fee-based.

http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/