Dennis Roeder: What Makes a Great Teacher?

While he’s still a young man who’s just started his teaching career, Dennis Roeder has often been enamored by what it takes to be a great teacher. It’s a question he finds fascinating because there is no easy recipe for teaching success, plus, different professionals use different styles.

However, Roeder has taken it upon himself to do some research on the subject, and here’s what he has come up with.

They know their subjects

Knowledge of a subject is one of the key things that a great teacher will encompass. It might seem obvious, but some teachers lack an in-depth understanding of their subject. Where this is the case, the teacher is less likely to have a significant impact on his/her students.

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They are careful with praise

While offering praise is a popular way for teachers to motivate students, it can also be harmful when employed in the wrong way. Praise can be interpreted in different ways, as sympathy for a failing student can be seen as either a way to encourage the child or pampering.

They provide quality

The quality of teaching provided by an instructor has a significant impact on students’ achievement, especially students who come from poorer backgrounds. Quality assessment and questioning are at the core of excellent teaching. It also involves giving children enough time to learn new skills and participate in finding solutions.

Dennis Roeder is an elementary math teacher who studied at the University of Sydney.

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Dennis Roeder: Principles of Effective Teaching

Dennis Roeder is an elementary math teacher in Australia who is looking to help students learn as much as they can in their young lives. While studying to become a teacher, he attended a few workshops and seminars on effective ways of teaching math. Like any attentive student, he took notes on these methods, some that are highlighted below.

Aim for understanding

For every subject you teach, strive to ensure students understand the “why” behind concepts, and not just the “how.’ This type of understanding (known as procedural understanding) doesn’t come easy and can take even years for a student to grasp a concept fully. It’s for this reason that math curricula often introduce a concept early in a child’s learning, then build upon it for some years.

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What’s your goal?

The ultimate goal for teaching mathematics is different for every math teacher. Some do it so they can finish the textbook in the designated time. Others do it to ensure their students pass exams. Others teach so that students can understand various concepts, such as addition, subtraction, and multiplication.

These goals, while noble, are sub-goals to an even bigger goal. If you think about, you’ll realize that perhaps you want students to understand how to apply math concepts in their lives, or prepare them for further studies in this field.

Walk the talk

As a math teacher, your attitude towards the subject is on display every time you address students. If you like math, then you should encompass an enthusiastic, passionate and committed lifestyle towards being the best math teacher.

Dennis Roeder is a teacher based in New South Wales, Australia.

Dennis Roeder: Effective Strategies for Teaching Math

An elementary math teacher in Australia, Dennis Roeder knows the subject is one that students struggle to understand, especially at early ages. It requires extra concentration and effort, something that differs with every student. As Roeder has experienced in his time as a teacher, teaching math also requires the instructor to employ various methods, some of which are explained below.

Add a visual element

Having a visual element quickly enamors young learners. Making use of textbooks that have graphical content helps to get the message across to students. Instructors who make use of graphics can pair them with specific guidance for effective results.

Education Blackboard Classroom Math Chalkboard

Explain solutions

Teachers are encouraged to get students to describe, verbally, how they reached an answer as this can help other students learn the basic concepts. As Dennis Roeder knows, many students hesitate to raise their hands to ask questions. If those who answer are required to explain their process, they are helping other classmates.

Individual feedback

Many students benefit from having personal feedback from their teachers about what they did right and where they can improve upon going forward. Rather than just provide the correct answer, teachers should also give students an opportunity to see where they made mistakes. Doing so helps students figure out solutions on their own.

Dennis Roeder is a graduate of the University of Sydney, where he undertook a degree in Education.

Dennis Roeder Enjoys Striking Scenery of New South Wales Coast

The Colony of Tasmania, the Colony of Western Australia, the Province of South Australia, the Colony of New Zealand, the Victoria Colony and the Colony of Queensland were all carved from the original large land mass which comprised the settlement of New South Wales.   When Australia was finally organized under one federation, the colonies of New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia and Tasmania became the founding states of the Commonwealth.  Dennis Roeder is a native of New South Wales.

Dennis Roeder

New South Wales of Australia is the first British settlement in Australia, established in 1781.  New South Wales’ total land area is 309,130 square miles and today’s population is 6,917,658. New South Wales was admitted to the Commonwealth in 1901, and has stipulated its state bird as the kookaburra and the state flower as the waratah.  Dennis Roeder has lived his life in New South Wales, which contains both coastal mountains and tablelands in the interior.  The state enjoys the Pacific Ocean on the eastern edge, and shares boundaries with Victoria to the south, South Australia on the west and Queensland on the northern edge.  Lord Howe Island off the eastern coast is also part of New South Wales, which is the most heavily populated of the Australian states.  New South Wales reflects the demographic variety of Australia as a whole, as well as illustrating the struggles of the larger country in its political and economic challenges.  NSW has dealt with changes in world industries and competition, developing different crops and markets when wool, wheat, dairy and meat prices declined.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/States_and_territories_of_Australia
https://www.britannica.com/place/New-South-Wales

Dennis Roeder Enjoys Neo-Gothic Architecture at USyd

Architect Edmund Blacket designed the Neo-Gothic sandstone original structures of the University of Sydney quadrangle and the Great Tower facility which are icons of the University in Sydney, Australia today, where Dennis Roeder earned his Bachelor of Education. The purchase of land in Darlington in the 20th century enabled the growth of the faculties of the Arts, Science, Education and Social Work, Pharmacy, Veterinary Science, Economics and Business, Architecture and Engineering departments, as well as the Faculty of Medicine. The new School of Information Technologies building opened in 2006, which today plays a significant part in the University’s continuing education program, inaugurated in 1886 and Australia’s longest continuous adult education program.

Dennis Roeder

Undergraduate Dennis Roeder attended the University of Sydney from 2012 to 2015, where he was enrolled in the Faculty of Education and Social Work to earn his Bachelor of Education degree. Roeder also benefited from the establishment of 15 other faculties, including the Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University of Sydney Business School, the Faculty of Dentistry, the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies, the Faculty of Health Sciences, the Sydney Law School, the Sydney Medical School, the Sydney Nursing School, the Faculty of Pharmacy, the Faculty of Science, the Sydney College of the Arts, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and the Faculty of Veterinary Science. According to 2016 rankings by the QS World University, the University of Sydney is 9th in Veterinary Science, 11th in Law, and 16th in Education, the school attended by Roeder. The U.S. News & World Report ranked University of Sydney 51st in the world.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Sydney

Dennis Roeder Attends the University of Sydney

Dennis Roeder of New South Wales, Australia stands poised at the threshold of his life.   This 22-year-old graduate of the University of Sydney has earned his Bachelor of Education degree to go along with his passion for working with young students, and eagerly looks forward to a successful career as a primary school teacher.  Roeder’s alma mater University of Sydney, known as USyd, Australia’s earliest university, is considered today to be a leading institution of learning in the country, with 16 schools of learning offering bachelors, masters and doctoral certifications.  A very large institution, USyd had over 32,000 undergraduate and over 16,000 graduate students in 2011.  The University of Sydney has the singular distinction of being ranked in the top 10 of the world’s most beautiful universities by both the British Daily Telegraph and the Huffington Post.

Dennis Roeder
Dennis Roeder

The University of Sydney boasts five Nobel Laureates from its lists of graduates and faculty, as well as six prime ministers and 24 justices of the High Court of Australia.  24 Rhodes Scholars have arisen from the students of the University of Sydney, a source of inspiration for undergraduate Dennis Roeder during his time there from 2012 to 2015, when he earned his Bachelors of Education degree.  The University of Sydney retains memberships in the Group of Eight, the Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU), the Association of Southeast Asian Institutions of Higher Learning, the Australia-Africa Universities Network (AAUN), the Academic Consortium 21, the Association of Commonwealth Universities and the Worldwide Universities Network.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Sydney

Dennis Roeder Faces a Range of Challenges and Choices in His Australian Teaching Career

Passionate and idealistic young teacher Dennis Roeder, who has recently acquired his Bachelor of Education from the University of Sydney in his native country of Australia, looks forward to a career in primary education in his own New South Wales.  Roeder feels a special affinity for the second and third grades, and while the number of schools in Australia which combine both primary and secondary students has gradually grown, schools which enroll only primary or only secondary students have declined.

In Australia public education from 2000 to 2010, the student to teacher ratio fell, especially in primary schools, where the numbers went from 17.4 to 15.8, while the number of enrolled students increased by 7%.  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students increased by 50% during this time, to 163,000, which is a combination of an actual increase in these students’ enrollment and an improvement in data collection of students who are more likely to identify themselves in these demographics.  Dennis Roeder’s success as a primary school teacher will have a direct impact on the retention rate of students, as the level of student engagement directly affects their participation in school, their continued enrollment in school and their rate of progress through the system.  The Building the Education Revolution program is committed to increasing funding for education throughout Australia.  Government expenditure on education increased markedly between 2008 and 2010, from $5.5 billion to $11.1 billion.  Roeder’s native Australian government is currently working to support his profession overall in his home country.

Dennis Roeder
Australian teacher Dennis Roeder is poised to embark upon his life’s dream:  teaching primary school students in the Australian school system.  Roeder’s duties will be many as a primary school teacher, and not all of his duties will be in instruction.  Grants from the Australian and state and territorial governments are the primary source of school funding, but are not the only places from which funds are derived.  Roeder may also have to track and record funding which comes in from the sale of services, such as the fees for tuition and materials which may be levied by the individual territorial schools.  Dennis Roeder may also need to be cognizant and punctilious of donations and investment returns which are part of the general fund of his school.  Although tuition is free in government schools, fees which cover such diverse items as personal educational materials like textbooks and art supplies may be levied.  Schools may also solicit contributions from parents, both in government supported schools and non-government facilities.  Non-government schools may charge a variety of fees for textbooks, subject materials and as support for extra-curricular activities of students.  Vocational training often charges fees for courses, tuition and materials.  Adult and community education courses also are often fee-based.

http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/